I’m a big believer that everyone should spend at least a portion of their life chasing their own dreams. Whether dream chasing is your life focus, or something you do a few hours a month, it has enormous value.

The act of pursuing dreams brings a sense of vitality and aliveness to your life.

It’s fun. It’s exciting. It’s invigorating.

You shift from merely existing, to truly living.

I get a lot of push back from my readers on this topic. People say…

  • Chasing dreams isn’t practical.
  • Dream chasing is for kids, not for adults.
  • If I chase my dreams, who is going to pay the bills?
  • It’s irresponsible.

The people who make these comments often perceive themselves as being wise and practical in deliberately not pursuing their dreams.

Rather than argue the point, let me frame things differently with the following statement:

If you are NOT fulfilling YOUR dreams, then you are probably fulfilling SOMEONE ELSE’S dream (without even realizing it).

If you’re at McKinsey and it’s not your dream to be there, then staying at McKinsey means fulfilling your manager’s dream of becoming a McKinsey partner off of your efforts.

If you didn’t want to become a surgeon but you became one anyway, you didn’t fulfill your own dreams. However, you may have fulfilled your parents’ dream of being parents to a surgeon.

If it isn’t your dream to get a loan to buy two cars, a big house, and have 1.7 children, but you do so anyways, you’re not fulfilling your dreams but might be fulfilling the dreams of your bank’s shareholders who profit from your decision.

My point isn’t to argue that you should or should not be fulfilling dreams.

My point is that you ALREADY are chasing dreams.

The only question that’s up for debate is WHOSE dreams are you fulfilling?

YOURS or SOMEONE ELSE’S?